Knowledge Base
cabin
A compartment for passengers or crew.

calibration
A general term for any kind of alignment procedure or compensation routines to improve the accuracy of a sensor.

capsize
To turn over.

cast off
To let go.

catamaran
A twin-hulled boat, with hulls side by side.

chafing gear
Tubing or cloth wrapping used to protect a line from chafing on a rough surface.

chart
A map for use by navigators.

checksum
For the NMEA 0183 standard, a validity check performed on the data contained in the sentences, calculated by the talker, appended to the message, then recalculated by the listener comparison to determine if the message was received correctly.

chine
The intersection of the bottom and sides of a flat or v-bottomed boat.

chock
A fitting through which anchor or mooring lines are led. Usually U-shaped to reduce chafe.

cleat
A fitting to which lines are made fast. The classic cleat to which lines are belayed is approximately anvil-shaped.

clove hitch
A knot for temporarily fastening a line to a spar or piling.

coaming
A vertical piece around the edge of a cockpit, hatch, etc. to prevent water on deck from running below.

cockpit
An opening in the deck from which the boat is handled.

COG
Course over Ground. Term used to refer to the direction of the path over ground actually followed by a vessel [a misnomer in that courses are directions steered or intended through the water with respect to a reference meridian].

coil
To lay a line down in circular turns.

communication protocol
A method established for message transfer between a talker and a listener, which includes the message format and the sequence in which the messages are to be transferred. Also includes the signaling requirements such as baud rate, stop bits, parity, and bits per character.

course
The horizontal direction in a which a vessel is steered or intended to be steered, expressed as angular distance from north, usually from 000° at north, clockwise through 359°. Strictly, the term applies to direction through the water, not the direction intended to be made good over the ground (see Track). Differs from heading.

course over ground
Term used to refer to the direction of the path over ground actually followed by a vessel [a misnomer in that courses are directions steered or intended through the water with respect to a reference meridian].

CRC
Cyclical Redundancy Check. Used within the NMEA 2000® standard as a type of check value designed to catch transmission errors. The transmitter calculates and sends the CRC appended to the end of the data where the receiver calculates a CRC based on the received data and compares it to the received CRC. A mismatch indicates that the data was corrupted in transit.

cross track error
the distance from the vessel’s present position to the closest point on a line between the origin and destination waypoints of the navigation leg being traveled.

cuddy
A small shelter cabin in a boat.

current
The horizontal movement of water.

cycle lock
In Loran C, the comparison, in time difference, between corresponding carrier cycles contained in the rise times of a master and slave station pulse is called cycle match. This value when refined to a determination of the phase difference between these two cycles results in cycle lock. (See also Envelope-to-Cycle Distortion).

 
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